Mantaining Mental Health

Post here for any topics about introversion in general.
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Xsolrac
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Mantaining Mental Health

Postby Xsolrac » Fri Jul 01, 2016 1:26 am

After reading an article from Introvert Dear talking about how introverts have a bigger chance of having mental problems, I wanted to ask, if you face or have faced that type of problems, or just become easily overwhelmed, what do you guys do in order to maintain a proper mental health?
Why does it has to be that way?

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Orientalist
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Re: Mantaining Mental Health

Postby Orientalist » Fri Jul 01, 2016 3:43 am

Practise Buddhism.
If the truth hurts, you ain't livin' right.

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Annie
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Re: Mantaining Mental Health

Postby Annie » Fri Jul 01, 2016 10:17 pm

Trying my best just to get through it.
I don't like seagulls...

Scottish INFJ

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Daisy
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Re: Mantaining Mental Health

Postby Daisy » Sat Jul 02, 2016 8:26 am

I practice positive thinking, I tell myself daily that I look good and feel good, and it works. ❤️

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SandWshooter
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Re: Mantaining Mental Health

Postby SandWshooter » Mon Jul 04, 2016 9:05 am

A cycle in which whatever stability I have developed falls apart, then I start from scratch without telling anyone about it
Hi, mac!

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Annie
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Re: Mantaining Mental Health

Postby Annie » Tue Jul 12, 2016 2:45 pm

Finding it really difficult just now.
I don't like seagulls...

Scottish INFJ

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Xsolrac
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Re: Mantaining Mental Health

Postby Xsolrac » Wed Jul 13, 2016 4:14 am

Annie wrote:Finding it really difficult just now.


Want to share? Sorry if I am being intrusive.
Why does it has to be that way?

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Annie
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Re: Mantaining Mental Health

Postby Annie » Wed Jul 13, 2016 8:34 pm

Xsolrac wrote:
Annie wrote:Finding it really difficult just now.


Want to share? Sorry if I am being intrusive.


Hi, you're not being intrusive to me don't worry :)

Just finding it difficult to remain motivated and feel miserable a lot of the time :/
I don't like seagulls...

Scottish INFJ

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DC1346
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Re: Mantaining Mental Health

Postby DC1346 » Wed Jul 20, 2016 7:59 am

Xsolrac wrote:After reading an article from Introvert Dear talking about how introverts have a bigger chance of having mental problems, I wanted to ask, if you face or have faced that type of problems, or just become easily overwhelmed, what do you guys do in order to maintain a proper mental health?


At 54 years of age (Just last year) I learned that I was on the high performing end of the autistic spectrum and that I have Asperger's Syndrome. In learning more about this disability, I learned that contrary to what I was taught as a child, I have a predisposition towards being a reclusive introvert because I am socially awkward.

I have had (and continue to have) problems with: recognizing individuals since I lack the ability to distinguish between facial features. I also have problems with understanding body language, facial expressions, and other points of view as they pertain to how that person might be feeling.

Every time I have to interact with anyone, I get a bit stressed out because I really don't know how the interaction will go. Lacking the ability to understand all but the most obvious types of nonverbal communication have put me at a tremendous disadvantage when it comes to interpersonal communication.

Having received a clinical diagnosis of autism provided me with a great many "ah-hah" moments as I reflected back upon the course of my life.

Far from feeling depressed, I now feel quite liberated.

As a child, I was always pushed to be a team player. I was pushed to be socially outgoing. I was told that I had to have friends and that I had to participate in extracurricular activities at school. When I became an adult, my parents expected me to date, to have a relationship, to meet a nice woman, and to court that woman, to marry her, and to have children.

I spent 54 years being fairly miserable because I was a square peg trying to fit into the proverbial round hole.

Since my autism comes with a genetic predisposition towards being a reclusive introvert, I embraced my diagnosis as a "get out of jail" free card. I essentially gave myself permission to become a reclusive introvert and to give up on my efforts to be a neurotypical ... someone who is normal and not in the autistic spectrum.

I let friendships and a relationship fall by the wayside AND IT FELT GREAT!

My life now is very simple.

I have home and I have work. When I'm at work, I don the facade of a chef instructor and I role play being the best chef instructor I can be. (And yes, that's my job - I am a chef instructor). On the way home from work, I run errands. After arriving home, I turn off my phone, I refuse to answer the door, and I expect to be left alone.

Insofar as I am a teacher on paid summer leave, I have spent a glorious month and a half in almost complete isolation. I have talked to a service technician who came to my home to fix my dishwasher. As a matter of courtesy I have also exchanged small talk with a cashier at a supermarket. I have not talked to any colleagues and have avoided interacting with any acquaintances.

So in answer to the OP, I find life (out in the world) to be inherently stressful and I live for the time of day (or the year) that I may return home to my oasis of quiet and (with the exception of my 4 cats) perfect alone time. The only time this really becomes a problem for me is when things get busy at work and I have an evening or a weekend activity where I'm expected to participate outside my regular working hours.

I do not know if my answer will help the OP because I do not know why other people in this forum are the way they are.

I have a genetic reason (an excuse if you will) to be a reclusive introvert due to my problems with social awkwardness. In another time, I would have been a consummate lighthouse keeper. I suppose that I could have also been the wise sage on the mount save for the fact that I would not have enjoyed having the occasional pilgrim intrude upon my privacy to ask me ridiculous questions.

Regards,

David

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Xsolrac
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Re: Mantaining Mental Health

Postby Xsolrac » Mon Jul 25, 2016 3:30 am

DC1346 wrote:
Xsolrac wrote:After reading an article from Introvert Dear talking about how introverts have a bigger chance of having mental problems, I wanted to ask, if you face or have faced that type of problems, or just become easily overwhelmed, what do you guys do in order to maintain a proper mental health?


At 54 years of age (Just last year) I learned that I was on the high performing end of the autistic spectrum and that I have Asperger's Syndrome. In learning more about this disability, I learned that contrary to what I was taught as a child, I have a predisposition towards being a reclusive introvert because I am socially awkward.

I have had (and continue to have) problems with: recognizing individuals since I lack the ability to distinguish between facial features. I also have problems with understanding body language, facial expressions, and other points of view as they pertain to how that person might be feeling.

Every time I have to interact with anyone, I get a bit stressed out because I really don't know how the interaction will go. Lacking the ability to understand all but the most obvious types of nonverbal communication have put me at a tremendous disadvantage when it comes to interpersonal communication.

Having received a clinical diagnosis of autism provided me with a great many "ah-hah" moments as I reflected back upon the course of my life.

Far from feeling depressed, I now feel quite liberated.

As a child, I was always pushed to be a team player. I was pushed to be socially outgoing. I was told that I had to have friends and that I had to participate in extracurricular activities at school. When I became an adult, my parents expected me to date, to have a relationship, to meet a nice woman, and to court that woman, to marry her, and to have children.

I spent 54 years being fairly miserable because I was a square peg trying to fit into the proverbial round hole.

Since my autism comes with a genetic predisposition towards being a reclusive introvert, I embraced my diagnosis as a "get out of jail" free card. I essentially gave myself permission to become a reclusive introvert and to give up on my efforts to be a neurotypical ... someone who is normal and not in the autistic spectrum.

I let friendships and a relationship fall by the wayside AND IT FELT GREAT!

My life now is very simple.

I have home and I have work. When I'm at work, I don the facade of a chef instructor and I role play being the best chef instructor I can be. (And yes, that's my job - I am a chef instructor). On the way home from work, I run errands. After arriving home, I turn off my phone, I refuse to answer the door, and I expect to be left alone.

Insofar as I am a teacher on paid summer leave, I have spent a glorious month and a half in almost complete isolation. I have talked to a service technician who came to my home to fix my dishwasher. As a matter of courtesy I have also exchanged small talk with a cashier at a supermarket. I have not talked to any colleagues and have avoided interacting with any acquaintances.

So in answer to the OP, I find life (out in the world) to be inherently stressful and I live for the time of day (or the year) that I may return home to my oasis of quiet and (with the exception of my 4 cats) perfect alone time. The only time this really becomes a problem for me is when things get busy at work and I have an evening or a weekend activity where I'm expected to participate outside my regular working hours.

I do not know if my answer will help the OP because I do not know why other people in this forum are the way they are.

I have a genetic reason (an excuse if you will) to be a reclusive introvert due to my problems with social awkwardness. In another time, I would have been a consummate lighthouse keeper. I suppose that I could have also been the wise sage on the mount save for the fact that I would not have enjoyed having the occasional pilgrim intrude upon my privacy to ask me ridiculous questions.

Regards,

David


Your case is really interesting, the oposite of everything I was thinking actually. It is nice to see that you actually use your problem (is calling it that ok? I don´t wanna be rude) to be able to live happier. I suppose a lot of things are really just the way we make them out to be?

Also, sorry for late responce, hadn´t been here in a small while.
Why does it has to be that way?

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DC1346
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Re: Mantaining Mental Health

Postby DC1346 » Mon Jul 25, 2016 4:04 am

My condition is a disability for which there is no cure.

If you were to meet me, I could pass for normal but I am not normal and never will be. I am autistic. My condition is genetic, not psychological.

On the brighter side, while this disability has made me socially awkward, I have been blessed with above average intelligence (170 IQ) and the ability to focus within areas of interest.

I can for example, write a 40,000 word novel, fully edited, revised, and ready to publish within 1.5 months. From start to finish, I can prepare a 1 hour formal university quality workshop on any given topic within my fields of expertise complete with PowerPoint slides that include made from scratch film clips, pictures, and graphs within 2-3 days and will literally work around the clock until I am finished.

My autism is a social inhibition. I will never be the life of the party or have friends and family but I am respected in my field and unlike others who are on the lower end of the autistic spectrum, I am capable of living on my own.

For me this is enough.

Sadly I know others who have been unable to come to terms with their condition. These people will always be on the outside looking in and will never achieve any degree of contentment with their lives until they accept the fact of who they are.


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